0

Don’t Make it “Yes” or “No”

Don’t Make it “Yes” or “No”

When you approach a prospective donor for a gift to your charitable cause, what are two possible answers you expect? Almost everyone will answer either “yes” or “no.”

By making the choice between a “yes” and a “no” you raise the stakes considerably and actually reduce—yes I said reduce—the likelihood of receiving the gift you asked for. There’s a unique fundraising idea.

How is that?

Principle 1 of The Eight Principles™ is Donors are the Drivers™.   Donors drive philanthropy through their values, visions. Their gifts are expressions of these. Don’t ever forget that. A charitable gift from a thoughtful philanthropist is not about you or your organization. It’s about their view of the world and what they want to change.

With this truth in mind, asking someone for a gift in such a way where the prospective investor’s only options for response are ‘yes’ or ‘no’ means that your request must be an absolute bull’s eye with what the person is thinking.

Instead, frame your request with options that allow you to tack slightly–broaden the intended use, encourage a flexible payment timeline. Craft your message to allow for subtle differences in worldview.

Notice I said ‘subtle’. I’m not suggesting you raise money for animal welfare under the guise of education. I AM suggesting that you become aware of your prospective investors’ particular worldview and visions and craft your message to fit within these.Remember, getting a positive result when seeking a charitable gift is far more likely when you offer the prospective investor subtle choices rather than urgent demands.

Remember, getting a positive result when seeking a charitable gift is far more likely when you offer the prospective investor subtle choices rather than urgent demands.

Leave a Reply